Urban Oceania

Exploring Urban Social Change in Oceania

Urban Oceania is a collective of students and academics who are interested in exploring urban social change in Oceania. The region is increasingly experiencing a variety of global environmental, economic, and political processes that are driving social change. We specifically explore how climate change, aid policy, shifting gender relations, infrastructural development, urban-rural migration, natural resource and land management, and social media use, are all changing how contemporary life is experienced in Oceania.

Our collective delves into these topics through a weekly online reading group. Each week we come together to discuss and debate ideas of a scholarly academic article. The reading group provides a comfortable format to learn and share ideas concerning urban social change in Oceania. We also write reviews of these journal articles to build upon our discussions.

Our members are also encouraged to explore these ideas in a longer format by submitting articles. These articles are shared across academic and social networks in a way that allows members to receive feedback on their ideas concerning urban social change in Oceania. This allows members to continue developing and engaging with these ideas.


Latest Post


Network Co-ordinator

I am a Post-Doctoral researcher on the ERC-funded TransOcean Project at the Chr. Michelsen Institute (CMI), Norway. My portion of the project sets out to analyze maritime mobilities, exchange, and conservation, in the increasingly securitised region of Oceania. I graduated with a PhD from the School of Media and Communications at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) University. My ethnographic fieldwork in Suva Fiji analyses how rural-urban migrants living in “informal settlements” articulate tradition in urban spaces. I am the network co-ordinator of Urban Oceania and am committed to exploring emerging ideas in the region.


Author

  • I am a Post-Doctoral researcher on the ERC-funded TransOcean Project at the Chr. Michelsen Institute (CMI), Norway. My portion of the project sets out to analyze maritime mobilities, exchange, and conservation, in the increasingly securitised region of Oceania. I graduated with a PhD from the School of Media and Communications at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) University. My ethnographic fieldwork in Suva Fiji analyses how rural-urban migrants living in “informal settlements” articulate tradition in urban spaces.